Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics Lesson of the Day – Convex Functions and Jensen’s Inequality

Consider a real-valued function f(x) that is continuous on the interval [x_1, x_2], where x_1 and x_2 are any 2 points in the domain of f(x).  Let

x_m = 0.5x_1 + 0.5x_2

be the midpoint of x_1 and x_2.  Then, if

f(x_m) \leq 0.5f(x_1) + 0.5f(x_2),

then f(x) is defined to be midpoint convex.

More generally, let’s consider any point within the interval [x_1, x_2].  We can denote this arbitrary point as

x_\lambda = \lambda x_1 + (1 - \lambda)x_2, where 0 < \lambda < 1.

Then, if

f(x_\lambda) \leq \lambda f(x_1) + (1 - \lambda) f(x_2),

then f(x) is defined to be convex.  If

f(x_\lambda) < \lambda f(x_1) + (1 - \lambda) f(x_2),

then f(x) is defined to be strictly convex.

There is a very elegant and powerful relationship about convex functions in mathematics and in mathematical statistics called Jensen’s inequality.  It states that, for any random variable Y with a finite expected value and for any convex function g(y),

E[g(Y)] \geq g[E(Y)].

A function f(x) is defined to be concave if -f(x) is convex.  Thus, Jensen’s inequality can also be stated for concave functions.  For any random variable Z with a finite expected value and for any concave function h(z),

E[h(Z)] \leq h[E(Z)].

In future Statistics Lessons of the Day, I will prove Jensen’s inequality and discuss some of its implications in mathematical statistics.

Mathematical and Applied Statistics Lesson of the Day – The Motivation and Intuition Behind Chebyshev’s Inequality

In 2 recent Statistics Lessons of the Day, I

Chebyshev’s inequality is just a special version of Markov’s inequality; thus, their motivations and intuitions are similar.

P[|X - \mu| \geq k \sigma] \leq 1 \div k^2

Markov’s inequality roughly says that a random variable X is most frequently observed near its expected value, \mu.  Remarkably, it quantifies just how often X is far away from \mu.  Chebyshev’s inequality goes one step further and quantifies that distance between X and \mu in terms of the number of standard deviations away from \mu.  It roughly says that the probability of X being k standard deviations away from \mu is at most k^{-2}.  Notice that this upper bound decreases as k increases – confirming our intuition that it is highly improbable for X to be far away from \mu.

As with Markov’s inequality, Chebyshev’s inequality applies to any random variable X, as long as E(X) and V(X) are finite.  (Markov’s inequality requires only E(X) to be finite.)  This is quite a marvelous result!

Mathematical Statistics Lesson of the Day – Chebyshev’s Inequality

The variance of a random variable X is just an expected value of a function of X.  Specifically,

V(X) = E[(X - \mu)^2], \ \text{where} \ \mu = E(X).

Let’s substitute (X - \mu)^2 into Markov’s inequality and see what happens.  For convenience and without loss of generality, I will replace the constant c with another constant, b^2.

\text{Let} \ b^2 = c, \ b > 0. \ \ \text{Then,}

P[(X - \mu)^2 \geq b^2] \leq E[(X - \mu)^2] \div b^2

P[ (X - \mu) \leq -b \ \ \text{or} \ \ (X - \mu) \geq b] \leq V(X) \div b^2

P[|X - \mu| \geq b] \leq V(X) \div b^2

Now, let’s substitute b with k \sigma, where \sigma is the standard deviation of X.  (I can make this substitution, because \sigma is just another constant.)

\text{Let} \ k \sigma = b. \ \ \text{Then,}

P[|X - \mu| \geq k \sigma] \leq V(X) \div k^2 \sigma^2

P[|X - \mu| \geq k \sigma] \leq 1 \div k^2

This last inequality is known as Chebyshev’s inequality, and it is just a special version of Markov’s inequality.  In a later Statistics Lesson of the Day, I will discuss the motivation and intuition behind it.  (Hint: Read my earlier lesson on the motivation and intuition behind Markov’s inequality.)

Exploratory Data Analysis: Combining Histograms and Density Plots to Examine the Distribution of the Ozone Pollution Data from New York in R

Introduction

This is a follow-up post to my recent introduction of histograms.  Previously, I presented the conceptual foundations of histograms and used a histogram to approximate the distribution of the “Ozone” data from the built-in data set “airquality” in R.  Today, I will examine this distribution in more detail by overlaying the histogram with parametric and non-parametric kernel density plots.  I will finally answer the question that I have asked (and hinted to answer) several times: Are the “Ozone” data normally distributed, or is another distribution more suitable?

histogram and kernel density plot

Read the rest of this post to learn how to combine histograms with density curves like this above plot!

This is another post in my continuing series on exploratory data analysis (EDA).  Previous posts in this series on EDA include

Read more of this post

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