Update to “A Story About Perseverance – Inspiration From My Old Professor”

Names and details in this blog post have been altered to protect the privacy of its subjects.

In 2014, I wrote about a former professor, Dr. Baker, who suffered from a chronic liver disorder and endured complications from her liver transplant.

I recently heard from Dr. Perez and Dr. Baker about some wonderful news: Dr. Baker just earned tenure in her job as a professor.  This required her to get letters of recommendation from researchers in her field.  Trusted sources revealed that those letters contained glowing appraisals of Dr. Baker’s work.  I was very glad to learn of both this endorsement and the eventual attainment of a treasured milestone for Dr. Baker.

Besides this professional achievement, Dr. Baker has also improved her health significantly through disciplined care of her health, especially via exercise.  I was delighted to learn of this progress.

Congratulations, Dr. Baker.  Your example shows that perseverance can bring great rewards.  I hope that you and Dr. Perez enjoyed your celebratory lunch together.

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David Veitch on Rational vs. Irrational Numbers and Countability – The Central Equilibrium – Episode 7

I am so grateful that David Veitch appeared on my talk show, “The Central Equilibrium“, to talk about rational vs. irrational numbers.  While defining irrational numbers, he proved that \sqrt{2} is an irrational number.  He then talked about the concept of bijections while defining countability, and he showed that rational numbers are countable.

David used to work as a bond trader for Bank of America.  He writes a personal blog, and you can follow him on Twitter (@daveveitch).  He recently earned admission into the Master of Science program in statistics at the University of Toronto, and he will begin that program soon.  Congratulations, David!  Thanks for being a guest on my show!

Part 1

 

Part 2

My new job as the Digital Marketing Analyst at Environics Analytics

As I approach my second anniversary of working at Environics Analytics, I am excited to accept a job offer to become our Digital Marketing Analyst.  In this new role, I am developing strategies to establish my company’s brand and promote our products and services on social media.  I am also using statistics to assess the effectiveness of our marketing efforts, both online and offline.

As The Chemical Statistician, I have written extensively on this blog, produced video tutorials on my YouTube channel, hosted a talk show (The Central Equilibrium), and shared my interests on Twitter (@chemstateric).  Mirroring these efforts in my new job, I will write articles on our company’s blog, produce YouTube videos, interview our staff, and engage with clients on Twitter (@EricCaiEA) and LinkedIn.

Eric sitting under EA logo

I am grateful to work with some wonderful colleagues who are friendly, helpful, and dedicated in their work.  It has been a pleasure to contribute to such a collaborative and joyful atmosphere, and I look forward to making a big impact with my new responsibilities!

Some SAS procedures (like PROC REG, GLM, ANOVA, SQL, and IML) end with “QUIT;”, not “RUN;”

Most SAS procedures require the

RUN;

statement to signal their termination.  However, there are some notable exceptions to this.

I have written about PROC SQL many times on my blog, and this procedure requires the

QUIT;

statement instead.

It turns out that there is another set of statistical procedures that require the QUIT statement, and some of them are very common.  They are called interactive procedures, and they include PROC REG, PROC GLM, and PROC ANOVAIf you end them with RUN rather than QUIT, then you will run into problems with displaying further output.  For example, if you try to output a data set from one such PROC and end it with the RUN statement, then you will get this error message:

ERROR: You cannot open WORK.MYDATA.DATA for input access with record-level 
control because WORK.MYDATA.DATA is in use by you in resource environment 
REG.

WORK.MYDATA cannot be opened.

You will also notice that the Program Editor says “PROC … running” in its banner when you end such a PROC with RUN rather than QUIT.

I don’t like this exception, but, alas, it does exist.  You can find out more about these interactive procedures in SAS Usage Note #37105.  As this note says, the ANOVA, ARIMA, CATMOD, FACTEX, GLM, MODEL, OPTEX, PLAN, and REG procedures are interactive procedures, and they all require the QUIT statement for termination.

PROC IML is not mentioned in that usage note, but this procedure also requires the QUIT statement.  Rick Wicklin has written an article about this on his blog, The DO Loop.