A macro to automate the creation of indicator variables in SAS

In a recent blog post, I introduced an easy and efficient way to create indicator variables from categorical variables in SAS.  This method pretends to run logistic regression, but it really is using PROC LOGISTIC to get the design matrix based on dummy-variable coding.  I shared SAS code for how to do so, step-by-step.

I write this follow-up post to provide a macro that you can use to execute all of those steps in one line.  If you have not read my previous post on this topic, then I strongly encourage you to do that first.  Don’t use this macro blindly.

Here is the macro.  The key steps are

  1. Run PROC LOGISTIC to get the design matrix (which has the indicator variables)
  2. Merge the original data with the newly created indicator variables
  3. Delete the “INDICATORS” data set, which was created in an intermediate step
%macro create_indicators(input_data, target, covariates, output_data);

proc logistic
     data = &input_data
          noprint
          outdesign = indicators;
     class &covariates / param = glm;
     model &target = &covariates;
run;


data &output_data;
      merge    &input_data
               indicators (drop = Intercept &target);
run;


proc datasets 
     library = work
          noprint;
     delete indicators;
run;

%mend;

I will use the built-in data set SASHELP.CARS to illustrate the use of my macro.  As you can see, my macro can accept multiple categorical variables as inputs for creating indicator variables.  I will do that here for the variables TYPE, MAKE, and ORIGIN.

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An easy and efficient way to create indicator variables (a.k.a. dummy variables) from a categorical variable in SAS

Introduction

In statistics and biostatistics, the creation of binary indicators is a very useful practice.

  • They can be useful predictor variables in statistical models.
  • They can reduce the amount of memory required to store the data set.
  • They can treat a categorical covariate as a continuous covariate in regression, which has certain mathematical conveniences.

However, the creation of indicator variables can be a long, tedious, and error-prone process.  This is especially true if there are many categorical variables, or if a categorical variable has many categories.  In this tutorial, I will show an easy and efficient way to create indicator variables in SAS.  I learned this technique from SAS usage note #23217: Saving the coded design matrix of a model to a data set.

The Example Data Set

Let’s consider the PRDSAL2 data set that is built into the SASHELP library.  Here are the first 5 observations; due to a width constraint, I will show the first 5 columns and the last 6 columns separately.  (I encourage you to view this data set using PROC PRINT in SAS by yourself.)

COUNTRY STATE COUNTY ACTUAL PREDICT
U.S.A. California $987.36 $692.24
U.S.A. California $1,782.96 $568.48
U.S.A. California $32.64 $16.32
U.S.A. California $1,825.12 $756.16
U.S.A. California $750.72 $723.52

 

PRODTYPE PRODUCT YEAR QUARTER MONTH MONYR
FURNITURE SOFA 1995 1 Jan JAN95
FURNITURE SOFA 1995 1 Feb FEB95
FURNITURE SOFA 1995 1 Mar MAR95
FURNITURE SOFA 1995 2 Apr APR95
FURNITURE SOFA 1995 2 May MAY95

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Machine Learning and Applied Statistics Lesson of the Day – Positive Predictive Value and Negative Predictive Value

For a binary classifier,

  • its positive predictive value (PPV) is the proportion of positively classified cases that were truly positive.

\text{PPV} = \text{(Number of True Positives)} \ \div \ \text{(Number of True Positives} \ + \ \text{Number of False Positives)}

  • its negative predictive value (NPV) is the proportion of negatively classified cases that were truly negative.

\text{NPV} = \text{(Number of True Negatives)} \ \div \ \text{(Number of True Negatives} \ + \ \text{Number of False Negatives)}

In a later Statistics and Machine Learning Lesson of the Day, I will discuss the differences between PPV/NPV and sensitivity/specificity in assessing the predictive accuracy of a binary classifier.

(Recall that sensitivity and specificity can also be used to evaluate the performance of a binary classifier.  Based on those 2 statistics, we can construct receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to assess the predictive accuracy of the classifier, and a minimum standard for a good ROC curve is being better than the line of no discrimination.)

Video Tutorial – Calculating Expected Counts in a Contingency Table Using Joint Probabilities

In an earlier video, I showed how to calculate expected counts in a contingency table using marginal proportions and totals.  (Recall that expected counts are needed to conduct hypothesis tests of independence between categorical random variables.)  Today, I want to share a second video of calculating expected counts – this time, using joint probabilities.  This method uses the definition of independence between 2 random variables to form estimators of the joint probabilities for each cell in the contingency table.  Once the joint probabilities are estimated, the expected counts are simply the joint probabilities multipled by the grand total of the entire sample.  This method gives a more direct and deeper connection between the null hypothesis of a test of independence and the calculation of expected counts.

I encourage you to watch both of my videos on expected counts in my YouTube channel to gain a deeper understanding of how and why they can be calculated.  Please note that the expected counts are slightly different in the 2 videos due to round-off error; if you want to be convinced about this, I encourage you to do the calculations in the 2 different orders as I presented in the 2 videos – you will eventually see where the differences arise.

Video Tutorial – Calculating Expected Counts in Contingency Tables Using Marginal Proportions and Marginal Totals

A common task in statistics and biostatistics is performing hypothesis tests of independence between 2 categorical random variables.  The data for such tests are best organized in contingency tables, which allow expected counts to be calculated easily.  In this video tutorial in my Youtube channel, I demonstrate how to calculate expected counts using marginal proportions and marginal totals.  In a later video, I will introduce a second method for calculating expected counts using joint probabilities and marginal probabilities.

In a later tutorial, I will illustrate how to implement the chi-squared test of independence on the same data set in R and SAS – stay tuned!