Eric’s Enlightenment for Wednesday, May 27, 2015

  1. Why do humans get schizophrenia, but other animals don’t?
  2. At Marginal Revolution, Ramez Naam recently argued that CRISPR (with all of the limitations in some recent research) should not be feared in two blog posts – Part 1 and Part 2.
  3. Ecological fallacies and exception fallacies – two common mistakes in reasoning, statistics and scientific research.
  4. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are the most effective contraceptives, so why is their usage so low?  Shefali Luthra reports that – at least for teenage girls – pediatricians were not trained to insert them in their education.  Maddie Oatman finds more complicated reasons for women in general.

Eric’s Enlightenment for Tuesday, May 5, 2015

  1. The inherent flaws of defining and estimating job vacancy rates – a commentary by Philip Cross, a former chief economic analyst at Statistics Canada.
  2. Adding to my previous entry about CRISPR, here is Douglas Mortlock’s in-depth discussion of the problems in Jiang et al.’s study.  Note that his entire blog is devoted to CRISPR.
  3. Robin Hanson’s proposal to evaluate teachers and students using linear regression while controlling for related variables.
  4. A video on the health benefits of avocados from a chemical perspective – including the best way to cut an avocado and how to slow the browning of a guacamole dip.

Eric’s Enlightenment for Thursday, April 23, 2015

  1. Reaching the NBA Finals has been much more difficult in the Western Conference than in the Eastern Conference in the past 15 years.
  2. In terms of points above average shooter per 100 shots, Kyle Korver ranks first in 2014-2015 with +30.4 points.  DeAndre Jordan ranks second with +17.4 points.  (Incredible!)
  3. Evan Soltas evaluates “the rent hypothesis” – the claim that a larger share of income in recent years are unearned gains.  (More rigorous, rent is “a payment for a resource in excess of its opportunity cost, one that instead reflects market power”.)  This is Evan’s most read article.
  4. A research team led by Junjiu Huang from 中山大学 (Sun Yat-Sen University) have successfully “edited the genes of human embryos using a new technique called CRISPR”.  Carl Zimmer provides some background.  (HT: Tyler Cowen.)