Some SAS procedures (like PROC REG, GLM, ANOVA, SQL, and IML) end with “QUIT;”, not “RUN;”

Most SAS procedures require the

RUN;

statement to signal their termination.  However, there are some notable exceptions to this.

I have written about PROC SQL many times on my blog, and this procedure requires the

QUIT;

statement instead.

It turns out that there is another set of statistical procedures that require the QUIT statement, and some of them are very common.  They are called interactive procedures, and they include PROC REG, PROC GLM, and PROC ANOVAIf you end them with RUN rather than QUIT, then you will run into problems with displaying further output.  For example, if you try to output a data set from one such PROC and end it with the RUN statement, then you will get this error message:

ERROR: You cannot open WORK.MYDATA.DATA for input access with record-level 
control because WORK.MYDATA.DATA is in use by you in resource environment 
REG.

WORK.MYDATA cannot be opened.

You will also notice that the Program Editor says “PROC … running” in its banner when you end such a PROC with RUN rather than QUIT.

I don’t like this exception, but, alas, it does exist.  You can find out more about these interactive procedures in SAS Usage Note #37105.  As this note says, the ANOVA, ARIMA, CATMOD, FACTEX, GLM, MODEL, OPTEX, PLAN, and REG procedures are interactive procedures, and they all require the QUIT statement for termination.

PROC IML is not mentioned in that usage note, but this procedure also requires the QUIT statement.  Rick Wicklin has written an article about this on his blog, The DO Loop.

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Use ODS EXCLUDE ALL to suppress printing output in SAS while producing output data sets

I regularly produce output data sets from a SAS procedure, such as getting the variable names from a data set in PROC CONTENTS.  In these instances, I often wish to suppress any printing of the output in HTML or TXT.  Such printing of the results is often unnecessary, and it can cost a lot of time and memory.

Some SAS procedures have the NOPRINT option that suppresses the printing of output, but this is limiting in several ways:

  1. Some SAS procedures do NOT have the NOPRINT option.  PROC TTEST is a prominent example.  I checked the high-performance procedures like PROC HPFOREST (random forest) and PROC HPSVM (support vector machine), and I could not find the NOPRINT option for these procedures.
  2. I cannot use ODS OUTPUT to produce output data sets while invoking the NOPRINT option.  Here is an example.

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Eric’s Enlightenment for Wednesday, June 3, 2015

  1. Jodi Beggs uses the Rule of 70 to explain why small differences in GDP growth rates have large ramifications.
  2. Rick Wicklin illustrates the importance of choosing bin widths carefully when plotting histograms.
  3. Shana Kelley et al. have developed an electrochemical sensor for detecting selected mutated nucleic acids (i.e. cancer markers in DNA!).  “The sensor comprises gold electrical leads deposited on a silicon wafer, with palladium nano-electrodes.”
  4. Rhett Allain provides a very detailed and analytical critique of Mjölnir (Thor’s hammer) – specifically, its unrealistic centre of mass.  This is an impressive exercise in physics!
  5. Congratulations to the Career Services Centre at Simon Fraser University for winning TalentEgg’s Special Award for Innovation by a Career Centre!  I was fortunate to volunteer there as a career advisor for 5 years, and it was a wonderful place to learn, grow and give back to the community. My career has benefited greatly from that experience, and it is a pleasure to continue my involvement as a guest blogger for its official blog, The Career Services Informer. Way to go, everyone!