Tips for presenting at a scientific conference

Introduction

I served as a judge for some of the student presentations at the 2016 Canadian Statistics Student Conference (CSSC).  The conference was both a learning opportunity and a networking opportunity for statistics students in Canada.  The presentations allowed the students to share their research and course projects with their peers, and it was a chance for them to get feedback about their work and learn new ideas from other students.

Unfortunately, I found most of the presentations to be very bad – not necessarily in terms of the content, but because of the delivery.  Although the students showed much earnestness and eagerness in sharing their work with others, most of them demonstrated poor competence in public speaking.

Public speaking is an important skill in knowledge-based industries, so these opportunities are valuable experiences for anybody to strengthen this skill.  You can only learn it by doing it many times, making mistakes, and learning from those mistakes.  Having delivered many presentations, learned from my share of mistakes, and received much praise for my seminars, I hope that the following tips will help anyone who presents at scientific conferences to improve their public-speaking skills.  In fact, most of these tips apply to public speaking in general.

I spoke at the 2016 Canadian Statistics Student Conference on career advice for students and new graduates in statistics.

Image courtesy of Peter Macdonald on Flickr.

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Eric’s Enlightenment for Friday, May 15, 2015

  1. An infographic compares R and Python for statistics, data analysis, and data visualization – in a lot of detail!
  2. Psychologist Brian Nosek tackles human biases in science – including motivated reasoning and confirmation bias – long but very worthwhile to read.
  3. Scott Sumner’s wife documents her observations of Beijing during her current trip – very interesting comparisons of how normal life has changed rapidly over the past 10 years.
  4. Is hot air or hot water more effective at melting a frozen pipe – a good answer based on heat capacity and heat resistivity ensues.

Sulfur Dioxide, Sulfur Trioxide and Acid Rain: Pollution from Burning Coal

Introduction

It is well known that burning coal produces carbon dioxide, which contributes to the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere and, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, is a major source of anthropogenic global warming and climate change.  However, burning coal releases 2 other drastic but lesser known pollutants – sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide – which are responsible for numerous health problems and acid rain.

Coal_bituminous

Bituminous Coal – A low-grade coal with high sulfur content

Source: “Minerals and Materials Photo Gallery”,  U.S House Subcommittee on Energy and Natural Resources

via Wikimedia

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Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Urination and Thirst? A Lesson on Osmosis

A TABA Seminar on Diabetes

I have the pleasure of being an executive member of the Toronto Applied Biostatistics Association (TABA), a volunteer-run professional organization here in Toronto that organizes seminars on biostatistics.  During this past Tuesday, Dr. Loren Grossman from the LMC Diabetes and Endocrinology Centre generously donated his time to deliver an introductory seminar on diabetes for biostatisticians.  The Institute for Clinical and Evaluative Sciences (ICES) at Sunnybrook Hospital kindly hosted us and provided the venue for the seminar.  As a chemist and a former pre-medical student who studied physiology, I really enjoyed this intellectual treat, especially since Loren was clear, informative, and very knowledgeable about the subject.

blue circle

The blue circle is a global symbol for diabetes.

Source: Wikimedia Commons

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