Eric’s Enlightenment for Monday, May 11, 2015

  1. Benjamin Morris used statistics to assess the value of Dennis Rodman as a rebounder and as a basketball player in general – and wrote one of the most epic series of blog posts in sports analytics.  Contrary to popular opinion, he eloquently argued why Rodman was a better rebounder than Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell.  In a digression in Part 1/4 (a), he used assist percentage to assess John Stockton’s greatness as a passer.
  2. I enjoy reading David Sherrill’s notes on quantum and computational chemistry.
  3. Read the first slide of this biostatistics lecture to learn how to calculate the concordance statistic (a.k.a. the C-statistic or the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve).
  4. Here are all of the videos of David Zetland’s lectures for his course on natural resource economics at Simon Fraser University.

Eric’s Enlightenment for Thursday, April 23, 2015

  1. Reaching the NBA Finals has been much more difficult in the Western Conference than in the Eastern Conference in the past 15 years.
  2. In terms of points above average shooter per 100 shots, Kyle Korver ranks first in 2014-2015 with +30.4 points.  DeAndre Jordan ranks second with +17.4 points.  (Incredible!)
  3. Evan Soltas evaluates “the rent hypothesis” – the claim that a larger share of income in recent years are unearned gains.  (More rigorous, rent is “a payment for a resource in excess of its opportunity cost, one that instead reflects market power”.)  This is Evan’s most read article.
  4. A research team led by Junjiu Huang from 中山大学 (Sun Yat-Sen University) have successfully “edited the genes of human embryos using a new technique called CRISPR”.  Carl Zimmer provides some background.  (HT: Tyler Cowen.)

Free Seminar on Sports Analytics + Free Food @ Boston Pizza in New Westminster: 7 pm, Friday, January 23, 2015

I will attend the following seminar at 7 pm on Friday, January 23, 2015.  It will be held in a private dining room at Boston Pizza (1045 Columbia Street in New Westminster, British Columbia).  This seminar is part of Café Scientifique, an ongoing series of public lectures from my alma mater, Simon Fraser University.

If you will attend, please come and say “Hello”!

Reserve your free seat by emailing: cafe_scientifique@sfu.ca
**Note that there is no accent above the “e” in this address.

SFU Café Scientifique

Friday, January 23, 2015

Speaker: Dr. Tim Swartz, Professor, Department of Statistics & Actuarial ScienceSimon Fraser University

Research interest: My general interest is statistical computing. Most of my work attempts to take advantage of the power of modern computing machinery to solve real statistical problems. The area where I have devoted a lot of attention is the integration problem arising in Bayesian applications. Lately, my interest in statistics in sport has grown to consume a fair bit of my time, perhaps too much of my time.

Topic: Sports Analytics

Sports analytics has become an important area of emphasis for professional sports teams in their attempt to obtain a competitive edge. The discussion will revolve around recent work that Dr. Swartz has conducted in sports analytics such as the optimal time to pull a goalie in hockey, insights into home team advantage and the value of draft positions in major league soccer.

Café Scientifique is a series of informal discussions connecting research to important issues of interest to the community.  Enjoy light snacks and refreshments while engaging with cutting-edge, award-winning researchers from Simon Fraser University’s (SFU) Faculty of Science.