Video Tutorial – Allelic Frequencies Remain Constant From Generation to Generation Under the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

The Hardy-Weinberg law is a fundamental principle in statistical genetics.  If its 7 assumptions are fulfilled, then it predicts that the allelic frequency of a genetic trait will remain constant from generation to generation.  In this new video tutorial in my Youtube channel, I explain the math behind the Hardy-Weinberg theorem.  In particular, I clarify the origin of the connection between allelic frequencies and genotyopic frequencies in the second generation – I have not found a single textbook or web site on this topic that explains this calculation, so I hope that my explanation is helpful to you.

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Presentation on Statistical Genetics at Vancouver SAS User Group – Wednesday, May 28, 2014

I am excited and delighted to be invited to present at the Vancouver SAS User Group‘s next meeting.  I will provide an introduction to statistical genetics; specifically, I will

  • define basic terminology in genetics
  • explain the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in detail
  • illustrate how Pearson’s chi-squared goodness-of-fit test can be used in PROC FREQ in SAS to check the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium
  • illustrate how the Newton-Raphson algorithm can be used for maximum likelihood estimation in PROC IML in SAS

Eric Cai - Official Head Shot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can register for this meeting here.  The meeting’s coordinates are

9:00am – 3:00pm

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

BC Cancer Agency Research Centre

675 West 10th Avenue.

Vancouver, BC

 

If you will attend this meeting, please feel free to come up and say “Hello!”.  I look forward to meeting you!

How to Find a Job in Statistics – Advice for Students and Recent Graduates

Introduction

A graduate student in statistics recently asked me for advice on how to find a job in our industry.  I’m happy to share my advice about this, and I hope that my advice can help you to find a satisfying job and develop an enjoyable career.  My perspectives would be most useful to students and recent graduates because of my similar but unique background; I graduated only 1.5 years ago from my Master’s degree in statistics at the University of Toronto, and I volunteered as a career advisor at Simon Fraser University during my Bachelor’s degree.  My advice will reflect my experience in finding a job in Toronto, but you can probably find parallels in your own city.

Most of this post focuses on soft skills that are needed to find any job; I dive specifically into advice for statisticians in the last section.  Although the soft skills are general and not specific to statisticians, many employers, veteran statisticians, and professors have told me that students and recent graduates would benefit from the focus on soft skills.  Thus, I discuss them first and leave the statistics-specific advice till the end.

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